Post-Apocalyptic Dispatch (#24): Death Derby

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 16:27
Post-Apocalyptic Dispatch (#24):  Death DerbyPublisher: RPG Objects

It is a blistering hot day, the temperature so high you could easily cook an egg on the hood of a car. And in fact, that’s what a lot of people are doing, cooking food in the sun while scrambling to buy some cold refreshment to accompany the quick meal before the announcer’s voice fills the air again. Everywhere you go there are crowds of laughing, shouting, and excited people. The air is filled with the odor of burnt rubber, exhaust, and high octane fuel. The wind thunders at this altitude, but its nothing compared to the roar of precision engines, the rumble of heavily-modified cars shooting past at over a hundred miles per hour. Welcome to the “Death Derby”…

The city of Styx is known as the most populous “city” on the Twisted Earth. Here almost anything and everything can be had, from rare finds found at Flea’s Market, to exotic shows at Moe’s Moving Picture Emporium, to fellowship and hospitality at the Temple of Unending Joy. But Styx is also known for its entertainments, none more popular than the death-defying races held atop Red Rock Mountain, part of the local tradition known as the “Death Derby”. Racers from all over come to risk the infamous Red Rock Mountain course, a dizzying descent down the mountainside, along the cliffs of the Grand Canyon itself, through mutant-infested camps and minefields, across a dried alkali lakebed, and back up the mountain for a torturous hour-long ride. During the Death Derby anything goes; vehicle-to-vehicle combat, boarding actions, and plain old treachery. The winner is the first one to make it to the finish line. The losers… generally tend to end up dead along the way.

Price: $1.75
Categories: Company News

Battlemap : Trebuchet

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 15:20
 TrebuchetPublisher: Christian Hollnbuchner

This full color battlemap is the twenty second of a series featuring various terrains. This installment features the emplacement of a giant trebuchet.

The map is 27 x 21 squares in size, with each 1 inch square scaled to represent 5 feet. It is provided in 9 segments, which need to be assembled, in a single PDF using the letter format.

Price: $1.38
Categories: Company News

Safe at Home

Blood, Sweat, and Dice - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 14:29

Giving your heroes a home base opens up new options for fun at the table.

a castle

Keeps and castles are a staple of old school "paragon level" play.

How old were you when you started playing Dungeons and Dragons? If the answer to that question ends in, “-teen,” then you probably at some point spent hours and hours hunched over sheets of graph paper, meticulously drafting your favorite character’s castle, house, grove, or ship. Homework left untouched and fingers black with graphite dust, days could go into perfecting this imaginary space. One need only look at the castles people build in Minecraft to see that for many gamers, this desire for creation and design does not really go away in adulthood.

Give Them What They Want

Do the heroes in your game have a home base? Since basic D&D, heroes have always been able to use their hard-earned loot and prestige to get fancy digs. Giving the heroes a base of operations can provide all sorts of adventure hooks. If the heroes are gifted a frontier keep by a grateful noble, then they will need to defend it from savage orc barbarians. If they take up a life of opulence and luxury in a major city, then their home may be at the center of all sorts of scandalous rumors. Basing out of old dungeon they have cleared is certainly a viable option, but what happens when the original owner comes to take it back? Giving the heroes a space to call home and then drawing it into the story can help engage your players.

cover shot of DMGR2 The Castle GuideAs a player, a big part of the fun of having a stronghold lies in the design. Make this part of your game! Let the players design their own fort, and then let them know how much time and gold it will cost to build. One good reference for this, and many other aspects of medieval life, is DMGR2 The Castle Guide from Dungeons and Dragons 2e. Wizards of the Coast released this book as a free PDF a while ago, though it is no longer on their website. You can find copies online, though I am unsure of the legality of their distribution since Wizards took it down. You can also purchase a dead tree copy from any of several used game shops online. Another option is find a copy of the Birthright campaign setting, which contained rules for building castles as part of ruling a domain.

Once the PCs have a design on paper, convert it to a full (1″ = 5′ scale) battle map. This could end up being huge, but it is also a great tool to have handy in your campaign. If you really want to have the base be a focal point of the campaign, then there are all sorts of low cost printable, customizable terrain options on the web. Pick up an appropriate set and you can really go to town, giving your players time to build their base in 3D.

The Plan for My Game

In my home campaign, one of the parties has settled down as the lord and leaders of a frontier province. They have established a capital city, which is now really just a village, and they hope to grow at the game years go by. I have been wondering how to make this work as a battle map, and I think I came up with an answer.

The base will be a very large grass battle mat. From there, all of the buildings, roads, etc. can be modular, as separate pieces laid on top of the mat. Players can design their own buildings, like the wizard’s smithy, and choose their location. Now, as the village grows and the heroes add things like a fort and maybe eventually a full castle, they can just be added as a modular piece to the map as needed. Keeping all of the components modular means that the village will take a bit more time to set up when it is needed, but I will have all of the components available for other scenarios when I am hosting a different crew. Being a bit of a 3d terrain junky, I think this could be a lot of fun.

Giving heroes a home within the game world increases their stake in many aspects of the game. Give it a try and see how your players like it. I will include any results people share with my own results in a future post, once the village terrain gets off the ground in my home game.

Do the players in your game already have a place to call home? Do you map it out, or just play things fast and loose when it comes to specifics? Are there any books, supplements, or websites you recommend for would-be stronghold builders?

Categories: Blogs

Green Dragon Fortress - Maps Play Aid

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 13:04
Green Dragon Fortress - Maps Play AidPublisher: The Australian Wizard

The Green Dragon Fortress is a set of basic maps for use with any fantasy role playing game.

The maps are without adornment, GMs can add their own final touches to them as they see fit. They are also hand drawn and deliberately left ‘rough' in some areas. I could have gone over them with a graphics tool but I personally like the hand drawn look&feel.

The maps are designed with a square grid for use in the virtual desktop tool - MapTool (http://rptools.net/). Maptool is a free package and I encourage you to use it. It is however not required to use these maps as play aids.

There was once a mighty ancient huge Green Dragon, and it was slain by a great Hero, using the Golden Spear. The Dragon crashed to the earth and it was so huge that half its body lay buried. Only the Dragon wasn't quite dead, but it was mortally wounded as long as the spear remained within it.

In time the Liche Lord Asteroth found the still dying dragon and using his necromantic powers converted the still living flesh into a mighty fortress for his demonic minions. He then retreated into the Dragons Brain to find all the great secrets hidden within.
His demonic minions and their servants however prospered, and extended his domain within and without of the Dragons living corpse.

The Green Dragon Fortress is an epic adventure for very powerful players. The enemies are numerous and well defended. The lair is a maze of living and dying flesh, where necromantic powers have altered the functions to suit the needs of the inhabitants. The environment itself will be hostile to the players.

Gms may use the Lair in a number of ways:
• As an epic mission to slay the evil Liche Lord.
• As a search and recover mission, to find the Golden Spear.
• As a series of raids, exploring the body and its various components.
• As a frantic and desperate mission to rescue someone held within.

 

 

Price: $2.51
Categories: Company News

Villains and Vigilantes:The Power of One

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 11:30
The Power of OnePublisher: Fantasy Games Unlimited

For use with the Villains and Vigilantes super hero role playing game - A compilation of six solo-adventures to challenge your players! Pit your hero against a Thirties-style gangster, an enraged former pro-wrestler, a vampire on the prowl, an out-of-control gang of thugs, a militant vegan, and a villainess with a strange new power.
All are challenging with original villains in interesting situations for a single hero to prove themself against.

Written by John P. Adams.
Illustrated by Yad Ming Mui.

Price: $4.00
Categories: Company News

Fringes of Kara-Tur

WoTC D&D - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 08:00
Two character themes based around the Kara-Tur setting: the hordelands nomad and the sohei.
Categories: D&D

Love Letter to Ed Greenwood

WoTC D&D - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 08:00
One secret to creating awesome NPCs is to give them secrets.
Categories: D&D

D-Percent - 100 Dwarven Names

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 05:02
D-Percent - 100 Dwarven NamesPublisher: Black Falcon Games LLC

Your players zigged when you expect a zag. They asked you a question you didn't anticipate. You want to add details and avoid being repetitive. You need a ready supply of random generators! Welcome to D-Percent, Black Falcon Games' line of ready-to-use lists of themed items. Simply roll d%, consult the chart, and you have a handy detail right on hand!

D-Percent - 100 Dwarven Names provides you with a triple list of 100 male names, 100 female names, and 100 clan or surnames, giving you 20,000 full name combinations on one page! The first names are Nordic based, and the clan names consist of two word compounds.

Use this name generator to give life to your random non-player characters, planned heroes or villains, or even for your players to help name their own characters. Using this list allows consistency among your dwarven characters by keeping a standard naming convention. Never run out of dwarven names again!

This product is not specific to any particular game system, instead taking a neutral generic stance.

Look for other exciting Black Falcon Games products that save you time and energy, allowing you to focus on building stories and adapt to your players' ideas and decisions!

 

Price: $0.75
Categories: Company News

The Secrets of Tactical Archetypes (PFRPG)

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 05:02
The Secrets of Tactical Archetypes (PFRPG)Publisher: Rite Publishing
Not every leader rides into the face of the enemy on a shining steed. 

The Secrets of Tactical Archetypes offers six new options for conflict-oriented cavaliers, gunslingers, magi, rangers, samurai, and summoners who want to do more than just win battles-they want to win the war!

Create a Celestial Commander (Summoner) and call forth the devout against heresy! Play an Inspiring Commander (Cavalier) and show your allies how to lead by example. Design a Mechanist (Gunslinger) and let spellcasting foes try to claim your sidearm from cold, calculating fingers. Give a howl and let your Pack Hunter (Ranger) loose his wolves against any foolish enough to contest him. Epitomize the serene, unflinching resolve of bushido with the Shogun (Samurai) or weave a cloak of protective magics around your allies with the War Warder (Magus).

Each archetype offers a distinct and complete theme, shifting your character's emphasis towards the wise command of allies operating as a unit. Show the enemy that good leadership doesn't discriminate-master The Secrets of Tactical Archetypes today

Price: $2.99
Categories: Company News

October 1, 2011: James W. Does It Again

Steve Jackson Games - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 05:00


As all know, James Wallis rocks. The creator of (among many other things) Once Upon A Time and The Extraordinary Adventures of Baron Munchausen . . . well, he just rocks, and that's all there is to that.



And now he has put a complete roleplaying game on the back of his business card. Now, he acknowledges that this idea is borrowed from another James: the amazing and prolific James Ernest, he of Cheapass Games, who has been putting little tiny completely-workable dice/card/whatever games on the back of his business cards for years. But . . . a roleplaying game?



I'm in awe, if "awe" is the right word for a reaction that included a fit of actual out-loud giggles and a fist-bump into thin air. I'm going to play Here on Business the next time I go to a show. And I want to see James E's return move in the business-card game, too.



-- Steve Jackson



PS: See and hear James Wallis in this video, and marvel at the atrocities he brings to light. Did I mention that James rocks?

Categories: Company News

Good Little Children Never Grow Up (PFRPG)

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 04:19
Good Little Children Never Grow Up (PFRPG)Publisher: Sneak Attack Press

Everybody in Hedgebird knows that the old DeMay orphanage is haunted, but that did not stop the Perseville family from moving to town and buying the place. Nor did it stop the Tarnak boys from venturing inside. Now the children are trapped inside, and to get them out the heroes must confront terrible ghosts from the orphanage's past.

Good Little Children Never Grow Up is a horror themed adventure for five characters levels 4-5. You can run it either as a one shot adventure or as part of a larger campaign.

It features:

  • 3 Combat Encounters
  • 1 New Template
  • 1 Haunt
  • 2 New Magic Items

NOTE: This is the version of the adventure is compatible with the Pathfinder Roleplaying Game. It is also available in a D&D 4e version.

 

Price: $3.45
Categories: Company News

The Rifter® #56 Shipping Now!

Palladium Books - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 01:48

The Rifter® #56 arrived a couple of days early, and is shipping now!

  • Rifts® in space. The orbital communities and a new threat, by O.J. Pinckert.
  • Beyond the Supernatural™: Tainted Martyr P.C.C. by Steven Dawes.
  • Nightbane®: Dark Day™ Chronicles Four – short story by Jeremy M. Hutchins.
  • For all game settings – Time Travel rules by Greg Spivey and Jason Smith.
  • News and coming attractions.
  • Fiction and more.
  • Cover by Irvin Jackson.
  • 96 pages – Cat. No. 156.

Buy The Rifter® #56 now!

Categories: Company News

Kelek Thalgar & Shadow Vale: A Torn World Overland Map

RPGNow - Thu, 10/13/2011 - 01:13
 A Torn World Overland MapPublisher: Torn World

The Torn World Overland Map Series features high resolution images of the Torn World Atlas; an open fantasy setting for use in any system. This map is Kelek Thalgar and Shadow Vale, located in the heart of Maras and explained in detail on our website:

For use in your Torn World gaming session, or equally suited for dungeonmasters looking for overland maps to support alternate systems.

 

You want a quote? A QUOTE?! Do you see what I am about to do here? I am about to ride out to my Síðastr Barsmið; the Last Assault. To survive this long on the Náströnd Mur is miracle enough, and is obviously due to Athena's will. She has decreed I live this long for a reason - to bring my spear into the heart of The Blight one last time. Ride out, bring release to the undeath, and keep doing it until ... it's done. And you want a quote.

Very well, quote this and get out of my way:
'When one has nothing to lose, one becomes courageous. We are timid only when there is something we can still cling to.'

Ashial Heled- Sacred Order of the Owl Shadow.

This Overland Map Pack includes:

  • THREE high resolution overland maps:
    • 1 High resolution overland map representing Kelek Thalgar & Shadow Vale on a 500 x 500 mile scale in PDF and JPEG format.
    • 1 'hand drawn' representation of the same map to use as a player hand-out!
    • 1 'hand drawn' representation of the same map without labels - add your own labels!
  • Overview of the country, politics, climate and motivations

Sample images (and our other maps) can be found here:

 

Price: $0.50
Categories: Company News

Dream Factory

RPGNow - Wed, 10/12/2011 - 21:58
Dream FactoryPublisher: Catnap Capers
Finally, there's a roleplaying game worthy of your imagination.

Dream Factory is everything you and your friends need to tell a story but nothing to get in your way. An easy and rules-light system that nevertheless preserves drama and creativity. No complex tables or formulas, just pen, paper, and normal six-sided dice - allowing the real star to be who it always was, the boundless imagination of the players themselves.

This game is suitable for 2-6 players, ages nine to ninety. Because the system governs how stories are told, but not which stories are told, it's suitable for all genres, themes, and tones.

Some of the unique features include:

  • Safeties: that keep the story from crossing pre-arranged boundaries
  • Lynchpins: that incentivize specific story mood and feeling
  • Quandaries: the main challenge facing each player's hero

Whether you are a master of roleplaying games or have never heard of them before, this is the book that, from the deepest parts of your circle, can bring out the stories that are seeking to be told and breathe life into them.

In Depth: Presenting Dream Factory

The system is named Dream Factory because it is a facilitator for any gaming group to take the raw materials of creativity and imagination and produce refined gems of pure wondrous moments - unforgettable story experiences, moments of awe, and compelling heartfelt dramas. Fiction that feels not only as real as anything, but beyond that, rings meaningful and true. The story may be made up, but the journey is real - our made up characters bring us along for the ride, as the characters of The Neverending Story by Michael Ende would confirm.

All that is well and good; however one may well ask what is it about the rules of Dream Factory that makes this work? Why should a group of friends use this particular game to elicit their stories?

  • Simplicity and Balance

Dream Factory is based on a few key mechanics that are elegantly simple. So it's is not just easy to learn, but also has a system that stays out of your way until you need it. You spend more time story-telling and less time bogged down in rules, such as charts and tables, of which Dream Factory has none. It's a relatively short book - around 130 pages (with pages only 7" by 10"), not the three to five hundred pages (of 8.5" by 11") of most game systems. And well over half of this short book is devoted to matters such as helping those completely unfamiliar with RPGs as a whole, words of advice as to the nuances of the game, and several examples of playing the game itself.

The core mechanic is a straight-forward and simple: as in most roleplaying games, one player runs the game (the Gamemaster, or GM) while the others (the players) invent fictional characters they portray within the imaginary world of the GM's setting.

The group narrates what is going on, with the players announcing their characters' actions in the context of an ever-evolving world that the GM continues to relate. Sooner or later the story comes to a dramatic fork, where events could turn one way or another. The players pick which outcomes they are going for, and make an Outcome Check - using a few basic six-sided dice. If they beat the GM, they get what they chose; but if not, the GM gets to make the choice - usually a choice for more drama for the player's character's lives, or even possibly some kind of setback.

Of course, the players have certain resources they can wager, making it more likely they will win those Outcome Checks and allowing them to have more of a say in the progress of the story. However, the critical piece is this:

When players win an Outcome Check, they consume resources - resources that are acquired by the GM. But when players lose an Outcome Check, not only do they keep their resources but they gain whatever resources the GM spent.

The consequences are elegant. Every time someone wins an Outcome Check, the chance for them to win following Outcome Checks decreases. Likewise, every time someone loses an Outcome Check, the chance for them to win following Outcome Checks goes up. The more you win, the more you will wind up failing next time - and vice versa. This applies equally to the players and the GM.

This creates an exquisitely self-balancing system where narrative power naturally flows from the players to the GM and back again many times over the course of the game session. Unlike some games, in Dream Factory it doesn't matter if you play for one hour or ten, the narrative balance attends to itself.

The game was also designed to have only what is needed. Each character has four stats that each player gets to pick themselves. There are no numbers - you either have a stat or you don't. Your character can be "Good with his hands" for example, but never will have levels or skill ratings.

  • The Special Sauce

There are several additional facets of Dream Factory that together help make it the amazing game it is: Quandaries, Lynchpins, Safeties, and the Game Plan to name a few.

Quandaries are the roadblocks in each specific player's character's way - like feelings of vengeance, or being wanted by the law - or even character flaws like alcoholism. When a player allows their character's Quandary to generate drama they earn special Karma points that players can use to add to their chance of winning Outcome Checks. Each player character (PC) will have their own distinct Quandaries.

Lynchpins are game-wide - and every game has two of them. Their function is to encourage and incentivize certain kinds of play by rewarding players who embrace them. Every game is different, and choosing the right two Lynchpins will makes a tense scary zombie game feel very different from a light-hearted action-adventure romp.

Safeties are there to make sure that the narrative stays within each player's comfort zone, whatever that may be. Whether the game your group wants is PG rated or R-rated (or beyond), specifying the boundaries of allowable storytelling ahead of time makes sure that everyone's happy and that no one finds the resulting story unbearable.

Finally, Dream Factory has something called the Game Plan - which is basically a character sheet for the game itself, specifying not just Lynchpins and Safeties, but things like genre, mood, setting , and more.

Most of all, the entire fabric of the game is built on and prioritizes collaboration - not just among the players, but between the players and the GM. Although in many other RPG systems the GM's role is to compete with or antagonize the players, that is certainly not the case here. The GM is fundamentally on the players' side, facilitating the story of the player's character, creating roadblocks only so that they can be overcome - to ultimately help the players discover and give voice to the stories they seek.

What does this all mean? It means that with Dream Factory:

  • You can go from zero to sixty in just minutes. Setup is so easy and fast that you can be gaming within five to fifteen minutes of sitting down to play, even when starting from scratch!
  • With Dream Factory's baked in spirit of collaboration and the chosen Safeties, you can relax and enjoy the drama, knowing that it won't be taken too far.
  • With its rules-light approach, you can spend almost all of your focus on creating the story itself, not on math or charts - because there aren't any!
  • And since the system is setting agnostic, with the right choice of Lynchpins to shape the game experience you can explore any story you can conceive - from slapstick to gritty, from epic to personal, from historical to futuristic!

Dream Factory has everything you need in a roleplaying game and nothing you don't. Even if you are new to running or playing RPGs , have no fear - players and GMs have a chapter each, with guidance and advice on how to get the most out of this game.

And should you ever feel lost, the combination Glossary and Index will not only explain in simple terms the key concepts of the game (and RPGs in general), but each listing links back to the specific sections of the gamebook that cover each concept.
 
Dream Factory aims to be the roleplaying game worthy of your imagination. Give it a try, and see for yourself!

Price: $9.95
Categories: Company News

Fold-N-Go [BUNDLE]

RPGNow - Wed, 10/12/2011 - 21:03
Fold-N-Go [BUNDLE]Publisher: Rite Publishing
THIS IS A BUNDLE PRODUCT. WHEN BUYING THIS ITEM YOU WILL RECEIVE SEPARATE DOWNLOAD LINKS FOR EACH PRODUCT LISTED BELOW...



Fold-N-Go Singles: Altar
Regular price: $2.99
Bundle price: $2.99

Come and make a sacrifice at the Altar!

This has a greater meaning when your characters are fighting for more than just a little box on a map drawn with a dry-erase pen. Give the players something they can look at with fear and trepidation (or awe), something that inspires them to act like heroes instead of just thinking about the next action.

Layers

Product has multiple layers for different colors and a blody design! 

Images

Bloody Altar Reverant Altar

 

 

Never settle for silhouettes again. Give them the Altar from Lone Tree Games, and don't be surprised when your players seek to turn it over and defile it!

Video

Check out Lone Tree Games website and/or facebook...


Fold-N-Go: Castle Kit #1
Regular price: $14.99
Bundle price: $9.99

Great battles beneath watchtowers. Epic struggles to take a fortress. Desperate attempts to hold the gate.

All of these endeavors have greater meaning when your characters are fighting for more than lines on a map drawn with a dry-erase pen. Give the players something they can look at with awe and desire, something that inspires them to act like heroes instead of just thinking about the next action.

 

Images

Overview Portcullis Gate Bunkhouse Signalmound Angled Castle Walls

 

Each Castle Kit #1 contains:

1″, 2″, 4″, 6″ long walls in both 2″ and 2.5″ tall versions Angled walls in both 2″ and 2.5″ tall versions Portcullis in 2″ and 2.5&Pr...


Fold-N-Go: Dungeon Kit #1
Regular price: $11.99
Bundle price: $7.99

Spend your time playing not assembling!

Lone Tree Games brings you legendary artist Jonathan Roberts (Sunken Empires, Fantastic Maps) together with talented newcomer Brian Bartlow to bring you the best-looking and best-designed, papercraft dungeon around! 

Assemble your papercraft models in no time. Spend your time playing instead of constructing! Lone Tree Games has done its best to make these models glueless to help make the assembly process simpler and faster. A few thin items do require the builder to glue pieces back-to-back in order to get texture on both sides. However, the vast majority of the parts are glue-optional. 

Well-written instructions and large, clear assembly photos are key parts in Lone Tree Games’ products.  The product...


Total value:$29.97Special bundle price:$20.97Savings of:$9.00 (30%)Price: $29.97

Categories: Company News

Mutants & Masterminds Threat Report #41: The Looking Glass Gang (Part Two) (PDF)

Green Ronin - Wed, 10/12/2011 - 18:40

Mutants & Masterminds Threat Report #41: The Looking Glass Gang, Part Two (PDF)White Rabbit has made more than a few friends since coming to Emerald City... and what friends they are! A girl who can change her size! A man with such useful, tricky hats! A mechanical woman with unbelievable power over time! These three friends complete the Looking Glass Gang and make them capable of such exciting feats! With all of his forces at the ready, do the heroes dare face them down? This product is for Mutants & Masterminds Third Edition.

Mutants & Masterminds Threat Report #41: The Looking Glass Gang, Part Two (PDF)

Categories: Company News

The Box--Chapter Three: Nothing Ventured

Paizo - Wed, 10/12/2011 - 17:00

The Box

by Bill Ward

Chapter Three: Nothing Ventured

The girls were, by any objective standards, far too beautiful for the Point. But in the dim glow of the dockyard lights they did the trick. Silently the trio gestured, gyrating hips that would make the women of the Keleshite Emperor's harem seem bony lads in comparison, their impossible skin as smooth and silver as the moon above. Their black tresses—tinged with a seaweed green—hung in long clinging strands that managed to suggest more than they concealed. They were, when it came down to it, completely irresistible.

If you were born yesterday, Kostin thought with a smirk.

The pair of Shoanti thugs guarding the old rum joint moved toward the gorgeous trinity like fish pursuing a hooked worm. When they passed through the darkest and narrowest part of the alleyway, Kostin struck.

He slipped in behind the leftmost guard and smashed across the base of his skull with a lead-filled sap. The man dropped.

Opposite him in the dark a giant figure loomed up, felling the second Shoanti with a single blow from a sledgehammer fist.

"Nice hit, Gyrd," Kostin said, gritting his teeth as his voice came out too loud.

At the end of the alley, the three nymphs gave a silent cheer, flinging their arms up and bouncing on their heels like schoolchildren.

Kostin swiftly bound the arms of the unconscious Shoanti with rawhide tethers and gagged them with wads of cloth. Gyrd stepped in when he was finished, reeking of sour sweat and stale mead, and threw a guard over each broad shoulder. The Ulfen's chainmail jangled under the load. Kostin pointed further down the alley and the big northerner stomped off with his cargo to dump them where they would not be found until morning.

"Enough with the girls," Kostin said through clenched teeth, noting that the illusory threesome was now engaged in activity fit to make a Calistrian blush. With a final, sensuous wave they winked out of existence—and a child-sized figure vaulted onto a nearby stack of discarded casks and gave a bow.

"Not too bad, yeah?" Her voice was the very model of gnomish enthusiasm. "I actually met a sea-nymph once, you know. And so I took her likeness and this tavern girl that Gyrd used to know—well, everyone used to know, apparently—and—"

"Yes, Shess. But we need to keep quiet—" Kostin was interrupted by the sudden flaring of a light behind him.

Whirling around and drawing his sword in the same motion, he saw Aeventius and Taldara walking up from the opposite end of the alley. A glow like daylight emerged from the wizard's left hand, from the onyx and platinum ring that bore his family seal and was an integral part of his magic.

Aeventius held up his other hand before the livid Kostin could speak. "There are no watchers outside, no windows—the light is safe. But just to keep you from making faces..." The wizard—dressed more appropriately for a night at the opera than a raid into a dockside gang's stronghold—cupped his hand over the ring and brought the daytime radiance back down to something approaching a dim lantern.

"What's she doing here?" Kostin stage whispered, gesturing at Taldara.

The half-elf stepped between Aeventius and Kostin before the wizard could answer. "Why is that the first thing everyone says when I show up? You got me into this, Kostin—"

"Not this!"

"Yes, this. The box, the Shoanti—staying up all night and watching them try to save your father's house. Don't think it's all about you—he was a father to me long before I ever met mine. Besides," Taldara smirked, raising the crossbow she held at the ready, "this is better than sketching the Irespan all day." Her badger, wobbling where it clung to her right shoulder, chattered agreement.

"She followed me," Aeventius added.

"You aren't hard to track—and a city isn't so much different than the wilderness, especially the city where I grew up."

Just then Gyrd reappeared like some vast berg of steel and flesh.

Aeventius let out an audible sigh. "Of course, where the imp goes, the ogre follows. You smell like an alehouse latrine."

"That's where we found him!" Shess piped up, bouncing to Aeventius's side. The wizard flinched away.

Gyrd, bearded face impassive behind a tangle of red and gray hair, took a long pull from a leather drinking skin. The raw, almost chemical odor of potent spirits rolled out from him like an aura.

"None of this!" Kostin said, snatching the bag from Gyrd before the giant could react. "You can have it back when we're done."

"What did you think of my casting, Aevy?" Shess gazed up at the wizard through a shock of emerald green hair.

Kostin interrupted, clearing his throat. "Enough talking. Come." He moved back down the alley toward the old rum house.

"Too beautiful," Aeventius said to the gnome as he turned to follow Kostin. "And do not ever call me that."

"Of course!" Shess said, skipping in stride with the wizard. "I always knew you liked your women short and green!"


"It seems Taldara picked up a number of new skills in her years away from home."

Taldara moved to Kostin’s side. "Aren't you going to introduce me to your, um, 'gang?'"

"Certainly. Forgive my manners," Irritation creeping into his voice, Kostin turned back around. The group halted.

"This here is Shess, the best little sneak thief in Magnimar."

The gnome, beaming, gave a mock curtsey. She was dressed in a patchwork of styles and colors, resembling something like a collision between a Chelish noble, a Tian merchant, a Sczarni blade, and an Ulfen minstrel.

"And Gyrd here is, um..."

"Blacksmith," the giant answered, no expression on his ruddy, heavily scarred face. His chainmail hauberk gleamed dully in the light, and he held a battle-dinted round shield in his left hand. Gyrd looked as if he had just stepped out from a shieldwall—and was aching to get back.

"Really?" Kostin asked, surprised. "Well, ah, everyone, this is my oldest friend, Taldara, who is some sort of big deal Pathfinder now."

"Ooh," said Shess, eyes round with interest as she studied Taldara. "But I thought Aevy was your oldest friend."

"I thought I was his only friend," Aeventius said blandly.

Taldara smiled and opened her mouth to reply, but Kostin grabbed her arm and tugged her along behind him. "Plenty of time for all of this later!" he said over his shoulder. The rest followed.

Aeventius was correct in that there were no signs of observation from the rum house. It was as Kapteo Giuleppeschi had said—the place was boarded up and abandoned. The Sczarni boss had come through for him that afternoon, granting him not only his silver, but valuable information about the Shoanti hideout. Kostin had modified his original plan to storm their front door in favor of this one—to come in undetected through the secret back entrance the Shoanti used to slip in and out along the shore side of the Point. Further west of here was the Wyrmwatch lighthouse, marking the spot where the great Indros had battled the sea dragon. South and east, and you had a tumble of smugglers' wharfs along the mouth of the Yondabakari leading down into the slums of Rag's End. It was a good location for a pack of robbers and thugs.

"Door is clear," Aeventius said behind him, and Kostin turned to see the wizard's eyes glowing with an eldritch blue light.

The guards had not had any keys on them. "Alright. Shess, you're better at this than me. Get us in there."

"Yes, sir!" Shess, saluting Kostin ridiculously, leaped onto Gyrd's back. Drawing her sword, the gnome leveled it at the door like a cavalry officer ordering a charge. "Smash it, Gyrd!"

Before Kostin could react the Northman—Shess still clinging to his back—raised his shield and launched himself shoulder-first at the door. It crashed inward with a splintering boom.

"'Best little sneak thief in Magnimar,'" said Taldara, covering the door with her crossbow. Aeventius snorted in amused agreement.

Kostin, sword drawn and teeth clenched in annoyed disbelief, entered after the mad gnome and the half-drunk warrior.

Inside it was dark and empty. A few sprung and moldering casks rested against the walls, and the odd sliver of wood or twist of ship's rope littered the ground. On the far wall a doorless portal yawned blackly.

"So far it's as the kapteo claimed," Kostin said. "The old cellar of this place abuts the sunken warehouse. From there we’re right at the shaman's quarters. Most of the Shoanti should be on the other side, in the warehouse proper. We nip in, take down Azahg, get the box, set some fires, and get the hell out again. Questions?"

Shess raised her hand and Kostin pushed it back down. The others shook their heads.

"Alright, then. Let's go."

The way ahead was easy to see—years of wear had left a path of dirt and scraped stone for them to follow. The blocks of the cellar wall had been pried out to form a crude doorway into the domain of the warehouse—a shoddily built structure that had sunk and partially collapsed at its south end and had long been abandoned by any legitimate concerns. Scrabbling through the wall and into the building, they followed a sloping and precarious floor upward. Kostin wiped sweat from his eyes; the air in the warehouse was close and redolent with the stench of mold and decay.

A flickering light ahead caused Aeventius to clamp a hand tightly over his radiant ring.

There were two of them, talking animatedly in the guttural cadences of the Shoanti. Gyrd tensed as if to spring forward, but Taldara clapped a hand on his shoulder and bade him be still. With her other hand she held a finger to her lips, urging them all to stay quiet.

After a brief exchange, both Shoanti moved off down the corridor.

Taldara turned to the group. "They say Azahg and his wives have been a night and a day in his sanctum, and they worry. They wish to know what powerful treasure he has discovered in the box, but also do not know if they should counter his orders and try to enter his rooms." Taldara shrugged. "At least that's the most I could get out of it."

"You speak Shoanti," Kostin said, impressed.

"They aren't all bad, you know. I think they may have had to come to the city to turn into this." Taldara scratched her badger behind the ear. Lifting it gently from her shoulder, she nuzzled it before placing it on the ground.

"Mordimor will scout they way for us," she continued as the badger zipped off down the corridor. Taldara closed her eyes and drew a shape in the air.

"Tal, are you—" Kostin stopped at a sudden smack on the arm from Aeventius, who gestured for silence.

The badger returned as swiftly as he had left, and Taldara muttered a few words in a language Kostin had never heard, one different from the ancient tongue of magic he had listened to Aeventius utter on so many occasions.

Mordimor leaped into Taldara's arms, and the two commenced to have the strangest conversation Kostin had ever witnessed.

"He says it's clear, but he gets a bad feeling about the shaman's door. Or, maybe, what's on the other side of it." Taldara plopped the badger back up on her shoulder. It still muttered at her ear and Taldara cocked a playful smile. "He also says the wizard should go first."

"A woodland wit," Aeventius said, scowling.

Kostin led the way, stalking ahead with barely a sound. Shess followed, moving silently with little effort. Taldara and Aeventius came next, creeping forward with careful steps. Gyrd shuffled in the rear, heavy one-handed sword drawn, armor tinkling despite his apparent caution.

They paused at the door for a time while Aeventius and Shess examined it—the wizard scanning for magical emanations and the thief checking for traps.

Shess, now wearing a ridiculous pair of spectacles devoid of their lenses, gave a thumbs-up, while Aeventius murmured something incomprehensible under his breath. Finally, he turned to Kostin. "I can open it, whenever we’re ready."

Kostin surveyed his team. Gyrd, wicked smile on his face and skin flushed with battle lust and booze, had positioned himself at the door, ready to storm in. Taldara was beside him, eyebrows knit in concentration, crossbow leveled to cover Gyrd's flank. Shess bounced on her heels, eager as a child at the fair, her blade gleaming silver and naked in her tiny fist. Aeventius waited patiently, back straight as any aristocrat, a slender black wand in his hand.

Kostin moved into position next to Gyrd, and took a deep breath in an attempt to strike a mental deal with his heart to stop thundering in his chest. He loosened his grip on his sword and bent his knees slightly. A cold serpent of sweat trickled down his spine.

"Do it," he said, left hand poised above the door's handle.

A word from Aeventius and the door lock opened with an audible clack.

Kostin flung open the door to the shaman's sanctum—and a horde of creatures burst forth.

Coming Next Week: The triumphant conclusion to Bill Ward's "The Box."

Bill Ward is the author of more than 40 short stories for venues like Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, Every Day Fiction, Morpheus Tales, Rogue Blades Entertainment, and more, as well as game work for companies such as i-Kore and Urban Mammoth. A diehard fan of pulp adventure, he’s also an editor at the flagship sword and sorcery magazine Black Gate. For more information, visit his website at billwardwriter.com.

Illustration by J. P. Targete.

Tags: Bill Ward, J. P. Targete, Pathfinder Tales, The Box

2011-10-12T17:00:00Z
Categories: Company News

The Box--Chapter Three: Nothing Ventured

Paizo - Wed, 10/12/2011 - 17:00

The Box

by Bill Ward

Chapter Three: Nothing Ventured

The girls were, by any objective standards, far too beautiful for the Point. But in the dim glow of the dockyard lights they did the trick. Silently the trio gestured, gyrating hips that would make the women of the Keleshite Emperor's harem seem bony lads in comparison, their impossible skin as smooth and silver as the moon above. Their black tresses—tinged with a seaweed green—hung in long clinging strands that managed to suggest more than they concealed. They were, when it came down to it, completely irresistible.

If you were born yesterday, Kostin thought with a smirk.

The pair of Shoanti thugs guarding the old rum joint moved toward the gorgeous trinity like fish pursuing a hooked worm. When they passed through the darkest and narrowest part of the alleyway, Kostin struck.

He slipped in behind the leftmost guard and smashed across the base of his skull with a lead-filled sap. The man dropped.

Opposite him in the dark a giant figure loomed up, felling the second Shoanti with a single blow from a sledgehammer fist.

"Nice hit, Gyrd," Kostin said, gritting his teeth as his voice came out too loud.

At the end of the alley, the three nymphs gave a silent cheer, flinging their arms up and bouncing on their heels like schoolchildren.

Kostin swiftly bound the arms of the unconscious Shoanti with rawhide tethers and gagged them with wads of cloth. Gyrd stepped in when he was finished, reeking of sour sweat and stale mead, and threw a guard over each broad shoulder. The Ulfen's chainmail jangled under the load. Kostin pointed further down the alley and the big northerner stomped off with his cargo to dump them where they would not be found until morning.

"Enough with the girls," Kostin said through clenched teeth, noting that the illusory threesome was now engaged in activity fit to make a Calistrian blush. With a final, sensuous wave they winked out of existence—and a child-sized figure vaulted onto a nearby stack of discarded casks and gave a bow.

"Not too bad, yeah?" Her voice was the very model of gnomish enthusiasm. "I actually met a sea-nymph once, you know. And so I took her likeness and this tavern girl that Gyrd used to know—well, everyone used to know, apparently—and—"

"Yes, Shess. But we need to keep quiet—" Kostin was interrupted by the sudden flaring of a light behind him.

Whirling around and drawing his sword in the same motion, he saw Aeventius and Taldara walking up from the opposite end of the alley. A glow like daylight emerged from the wizard's left hand, from the onyx and platinum ring that bore his family seal and was an integral part of his magic.

Aeventius held up his other hand before the livid Kostin could speak. "There are no watchers outside, no windows—the light is safe. But just to keep you from making faces..." The wizard—dressed more appropriately for a night at the opera than a raid into a dockside gang's stronghold—cupped his hand over the ring and brought the daytime radiance back down to something approaching a dim lantern.

"What's she doing here?" Kostin stage whispered, gesturing at Taldara.

The half-elf stepped between Aeventius and Kostin before the wizard could answer. "Why is that the first thing everyone says when I show up? You got me into this, Kostin—"

"Not this!"

"Yes, this. The box, the Shoanti—staying up all night and watching them try to save your father's house. Don't think it's all about you—he was a father to me long before I ever met mine. Besides," Taldara smirked, raising the crossbow she held at the ready, "this is better than sketching the Irespan all day." Her badger, wobbling where it clung to her right shoulder, chattered agreement.

"She followed me," Aeventius added.

"You aren't hard to track—and a city isn't so much different than the wilderness, especially the city where I grew up."

Just then Gyrd reappeared like some vast berg of steel and flesh.

Aeventius let out an audible sigh. "Of course, where the imp goes, the ogre follows. You smell like an alehouse latrine."

"That's where we found him!" Shess piped up, bouncing to Aeventius's side. The wizard flinched away.

Gyrd, bearded face impassive behind a tangle of red and gray hair, took a long pull from a leather drinking skin. The raw, almost chemical odor of potent spirits rolled out from him like an aura.

"None of this!" Kostin said, snatching the bag from Gyrd before the giant could react. "You can have it back when we're done."

"What did you think of my casting, Aevy?" Shess gazed up at the wizard through a shock of emerald green hair.

Kostin interrupted, clearing his throat. "Enough talking. Come." He moved back down the alley toward the old rum house.

"Too beautiful," Aeventius said to the gnome as he turned to follow Kostin. "And do not ever call me that."

"Of course!" Shess said, skipping in stride with the wizard. "I always knew you liked your women short and green!"


"It seems Taldara picked up a number of new skills in her years away from home."

Taldara moved to Kostin’s side. "Aren't you going to introduce me to your, um, 'gang?'"

"Certainly. Forgive my manners," Irritation creeping into his voice, Kostin turned back around. The group halted.

"This here is Shess, the best little sneak thief in Magnimar."

The gnome, beaming, gave a mock curtsey. She was dressed in a patchwork of styles and colors, resembling something like a collision between a Chelish noble, a Tian merchant, a Sczarni blade, and an Ulfen minstrel.

"And Gyrd here is, um..."

"Blacksmith," the giant answered, no expression on his ruddy, heavily scarred face. His chainmail hauberk gleamed dully in the light, and he held a battle-dinted round shield in his left hand. Gyrd looked as if he had just stepped out from a shieldwall—and was aching to get back.

"Really?" Kostin asked, surprised. "Well, ah, everyone, this is my oldest friend, Taldara, who is some sort of big deal Pathfinder now."

"Ooh," said Shess, eyes round with interest as she studied Taldara. "But I thought Aevy was your oldest friend."

"I thought I was his only friend," Aeventius said blandly.

Taldara smiled and opened her mouth to reply, but Kostin grabbed her arm and tugged her along behind him. "Plenty of time for all of this later!" he said over his shoulder. The rest followed.

Aeventius was correct in that there were no signs of observation from the rum house. It was as Kapteo Giuleppeschi had said—the place was boarded up and abandoned. The Sczarni boss had come through for him that afternoon, granting him not only his silver, but valuable information about the Shoanti hideout. Kostin had modified his original plan to storm their front door in favor of this one—to come in undetected through the secret back entrance the Shoanti used to slip in and out along the shore side of the Point. Further west of here was the Wyrmwatch lighthouse, marking the spot where the great Indros had battled the sea dragon. South and east, and you had a tumble of smugglers' wharfs along the mouth of the Yondabakari leading down into the slums of Rag's End. It was a good location for a pack of robbers and thugs.

"Door is clear," Aeventius said behind him, and Kostin turned to see the wizard's eyes glowing with an eldritch blue light.

The guards had not had any keys on them. "Alright. Shess, you're better at this than me. Get us in there."

"Yes, sir!" Shess, saluting Kostin ridiculously, leaped onto Gyrd's back. Drawing her sword, the gnome leveled it at the door like a cavalry officer ordering a charge. "Smash it, Gyrd!"

Before Kostin could react the Northman—Shess still clinging to his back—raised his shield and launched himself shoulder-first at the door. It crashed inward with a splintering boom.

"'Best little sneak thief in Magnimar,'" said Taldara, covering the door with her crossbow. Aeventius snorted in amused agreement.

Kostin, sword drawn and teeth clenched in annoyed disbelief, entered after the mad gnome and the half-drunk warrior.

Inside it was dark and empty. A few sprung and moldering casks rested against the walls, and the odd sliver of wood or twist of ship's rope littered the ground. On the far wall a doorless portal yawned blackly.

"So far it's as the kapteo claimed," Kostin said. "The old cellar of this place abuts the sunken warehouse. From there we’re right at the shaman's quarters. Most of the Shoanti should be on the other side, in the warehouse proper. We nip in, take down Azahg, get the box, set some fires, and get the hell out again. Questions?"

Shess raised her hand and Kostin pushed it back down. The others shook their heads.

"Alright, then. Let's go."

The way ahead was easy to see—years of wear had left a path of dirt and scraped stone for them to follow. The blocks of the cellar wall had been pried out to form a crude doorway into the domain of the warehouse—a shoddily built structure that had sunk and partially collapsed at its south end and had long been abandoned by any legitimate concerns. Scrabbling through the wall and into the building, they followed a sloping and precarious floor upward. Kostin wiped sweat from his eyes; the air in the warehouse was close and redolent with the stench of mold and decay.

A flickering light ahead caused Aeventius to clamp a hand tightly over his radiant ring.

There were two of them, talking animatedly in the guttural cadences of the Shoanti. Gyrd tensed as if to spring forward, but Taldara clapped a hand on his shoulder and bade him be still. With her other hand she held a finger to her lips, urging them all to stay quiet.

After a brief exchange, both Shoanti moved off down the corridor.

Taldara turned to the group. "They say Azahg and his wives have been a night and a day in his sanctum, and they worry. They wish to know what powerful treasure he has discovered in the box, but also do not know if they should counter his orders and try to enter his rooms." Taldara shrugged. "At least that's the most I could get out of it."

"You speak Shoanti," Kostin said, impressed.

"They aren't all bad, you know. I think they may have had to come to the city to turn into this." Taldara scratched her badger behind the ear. Lifting it gently from her shoulder, she nuzzled it before placing it on the ground.

"Mordimor will scout they way for us," she continued as the badger zipped off down the corridor. Taldara closed her eyes and drew a shape in the air.

"Tal, are you—" Kostin stopped at a sudden smack on the arm from Aeventius, who gestured for silence.

The badger returned as swiftly as he had left, and Taldara muttered a few words in a language Kostin had never heard, one different from the ancient tongue of magic he had listened to Aeventius utter on so many occasions.

Mordimor leaped into Taldara's arms, and the two commenced to have the strangest conversation Kostin had ever witnessed.

"He says it's clear, but he gets a bad feeling about the shaman's door. Or, maybe, what's on the other side of it." Taldara plopped the badger back up on her shoulder. It still muttered at her ear and Taldara cocked a playful smile. "He also says the wizard should go first."

"A woodland wit," Aeventius said, scowling.

Kostin led the way, stalking ahead with barely a sound. Shess followed, moving silently with little effort. Taldara and Aeventius came next, creeping forward with careful steps. Gyrd shuffled in the rear, heavy one-handed sword drawn, armor tinkling despite his apparent caution.

They paused at the door for a time while Aeventius and Shess examined it—the wizard scanning for magical emanations and the thief checking for traps.

Shess, now wearing a ridiculous pair of spectacles devoid of their lenses, gave a thumbs-up, while Aeventius murmured something incomprehensible under his breath. Finally, he turned to Kostin. "I can open it, whenever we’re ready."

Kostin surveyed his team. Gyrd, wicked smile on his face and skin flushed with battle lust and booze, had positioned himself at the door, ready to storm in. Taldara was beside him, eyebrows knit in concentration, crossbow leveled to cover Gyrd's flank. Shess bounced on her heels, eager as a child at the fair, her blade gleaming silver and naked in her tiny fist. Aeventius waited patiently, back straight as any aristocrat, a slender black wand in his hand.

Kostin moved into position next to Gyrd, and took a deep breath in an attempt to strike a mental deal with his heart to stop thundering in his chest. He loosened his grip on his sword and bent his knees slightly. A cold serpent of sweat trickled down his spine.

"Do it," he said, left hand poised above the door's handle.

A word from Aeventius and the door lock opened with an audible clack.

Kostin flung open the door to the shaman's sanctum—and a horde of creatures burst forth.

Coming Next Week: The triumphant conclusion to Bill Ward's "The Box."

Bill Ward is the author of more than 40 short stories for venues like Heroic Fantasy Quarterly, Every Day Fiction, Morpheus Tales, Rogue Blades Entertainment, and more, as well as game work for companies such as i-Kore and Urban Mammoth. A diehard fan of pulp adventure, he’s also an editor at the flagship sword and sorcery magazine Black Gate. For more information, visit his website at billwardwriter.com.

Illustration by J. P. Targete.

Tags: Bill Ward, J. P. Targete, Pathfinder Tales, The Box

2011-10-12T17:00:00Z
Categories: Company News

0one's Blueprints: Eerie Forest - Zombie Island

RPGNow - Wed, 10/12/2011 - 13:57
 Eerie Forest - Zombie IslandPublisher: 0one Games

Eerie Forest is a haunted forest you can place anywhere in your own campaign. The forest is dotted with suggestive locations and interesting places to explore.

This blueprint contains Zombie Island, featuring the map of the island itself plus four locations: The Necromancer Mansion, Common Graves, Burial Ground and The Mound....

In the middle of the Dread Swamp lies a small island, commonly known as “Zombie Island”. In ancient times the Eerie Forest dwellers used to bury their dead here.

For many years the island was left alone with its load of buried corpses. Only a small community of fishermen attempted to build some residences on its southwestern shores, but they were quickly driven away by scary sightings and overnight haunts. The small village now lies in ruin as a spectral warning to everyone daring to set foot on the island...

Zombie Island

Necromancer Mansion

Features
Rule the Dungeon.
Enhanced customization (choose which features are visible)
Alternative hexagonal grid
"North" mark available and orientable
Master control panel allows you to control all the maps at once
Buttons for printing only blue maps or black and white maps

WARNING: you must use Adobe Acrobat 6+ in order to use all the features of this product

Welcome to Øone’s Blueprints!
The Blueprints product line offers you old-fashioned blue printed maps for using in your adventures and campaigns. For each map you get a blueprint version and a standard black and white version. The maps are all vector-based so you will get maximum print resolution. Despite their old fashioned appearance each map offers you a degree of customization, using the pdf technology at its best. A button (which will not be printed) on each map allows you to turn on and off the grid, eliminate the room numbers, get the walls filled, don’t show doors and furniture and many other options, depending on the kind of map.
Each product features a classic fantasy adventure location: a dungeon, a keep, a temple complex, a thieves guild and so on. You can use these map as reference to build your own adventures or simply take them at hand in case your players go in an unexpected direction during the campaign.
While offering you the best quality, these products are really inexpensive.

 

 

 

Price: $1.95
Categories: Company News

A Big PDF Release: Unknown Armies

Atlas Games - Wed, 10/12/2011 - 13:44
It literally is big (336 pages), as anyone who has lifted the hardcover book knows, but I expect this will also be big news for a bunch of fans: You can now purchase Unknown Armies 2nd Edition as a PDF for download from e23.  Be the first on your subnet to own a copy!

The print edition is available as well; check your local store's shelves, or pop over to Warehouse 23.
Categories: Company News

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